Scientists Have Told What People Are Prone To Violence After Drinking

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Scientists Have Told What People Are Prone To Violence After Drinking
Scientists Have Told What People Are Prone To Violence After Drinking

Video: Scientists Have Told What People Are Prone To Violence After Drinking

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Video: Alcohol-Related Violence | National Geographic 2023, January
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Scientists have told what people are prone to violence after drinking

Negative childhood experiences dramatically increase the level of violence after drinking: people beat others and get back.

Scientists have told what people are prone to violence after drinking
Scientists have told what people are prone to violence after drinking

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Alcoholics with high negative childhood experiences (NEX) are more likely to be assaulted after drinking, according to a new study from the UK.

The team pooled data from four studies (12,669 respondents) conducted in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. Results from a study published in the BMJ Open show:

1.3% of moderately drinking or non-drinking men without NDL hit someone during the year, among heavy drinkers this figure rose to 3.6%. And with excessive alcohol consumption, along with a high level of NDI - 28.3%.

  • The link between NDO, alcohol and assault can be traced in people of all studied ages (up to 69 years), but it is especially pronounced in young men 18-29 years old: about six out of ten (62%) heavy drinkers in this group hit someone during years (while among heavily drinking men without NDO this indicator is 13.5%).
  • A similar figure for women was lower, but still significant: almost one in four (24.1%) women aged 18–29 who drink heavily and have a high level of NDI hit someone.
  • In general, 8.6% of men reported a high level of NIR in the past, and more than half of them (every twentieth) reported a high level of alcohol consumption.

“We know that people who have experienced high levels of negativity in their childhood may find it more difficult to control their emotions as adults, including feelings of aggression. Our results show that when they also drink a lot, it can further reduce their control and increase their risk of involvement in assault,”said Professor Mark Bellis, lead author of the study.

The results of the study indicate that hitting children in childhood increases the likelihood of alcoholism in adulthood. In many cases, alcohol abuse is an attempt to cope with childhood trauma.

The researchers also found a similar relationship between NIR, alcohol and the likelihood of being a victim of assault. For 12 months, 0.8% of moderately drinking or nondrinking women without NDI were affected, and with a high level of NDI and more intensive alcohol consumption, this figure rose to 13%. In men, the difference was even more noticeable - 1.9% and 32%, respectively.

"If you hit someone, you will most likely be beaten yourself," said Professor Karen Hughes, co-author of the study. “However, some people experience child abuse and family abuse in their homes because of their childhood difficulties. Some women with this childhood experience may feel that it is natural to experience domestic violence, so they stay in abusive relationships and use alcohol as a coping mechanism.”

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