Human Papillomavirus Increases The Risk Of Cervical Cancer, Even Among Young Women

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Human Papillomavirus Increases The Risk Of Cervical Cancer, Even Among Young Women
Human Papillomavirus Increases The Risk Of Cervical Cancer, Even Among Young Women

Video: Human Papillomavirus Increases The Risk Of Cervical Cancer, Even Among Young Women

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Video: Cervical cancer patient gives advice to men regarding prevention of HPV 2023, January
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Human papillomavirus increases the risk of cervical cancer, even among young women

Women under 30 who tested positive for HPV types 16 and 18 had a much higher risk of developing precancerous lesions or cervical cancer even when other screening tests were normal.

Human papillomavirus increases the risk of cervical cancer, even among young women
Human papillomavirus increases the risk of cervical cancer, even among young women

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Young women, if they carry HPV types 16 or 18, are at high risk for precancerous lesions, even if other screening tests are normal, according to a study published in Cancer.

The study was carried out by the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, in collaboration with the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the Scientific Institute of Public Health, Belgium.

Four out of five women of fertile age acquire HPV during their lifetime. In 5% of women, the infection becomes chronic and can cause precancerous diseases and cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70% of all cervical cancers and most high-grade precancerous diseases. There are several other types of HPV that can cause precancerous and cervical cancer.

For the early detection of precancerous diseases in Sweden, women aged 23 to 64 are screened with endocervical smears. Then (if abnormal) the sample is tested for HPV. According to the new rules, screening from 32 years old should immediately take place in the form of an HPV test, and if the result is positive, a cell sample is taken. With normal results, screening is carried out after 3-7 years, and in case of a deviation from the norm - a gynecological examination.

Researchers studied the risk of cervical cancer in patients with normal smear results - over 9,000 tests performed on women between 20 and 60 years of age, as part of the Swedish screening program from 2005 to 2007. During the follow-up period (up to 2014), almost 100 of them developed precancerous diseases or, in some cases, cervical cancer. Samples of their cells were then tested for HPV and compared individually with samples from healthy women. Scientists found that women over 30 years old who were carriers of HPV high oncogenic risk (regardless of type), the risk of developing precancerous diseases or cancer was 8 times higher than women with negative HPV results.

“Normal cell tests do not guarantee that a woman will not develop precancerous changes that can lead to cervical cancer. Therefore, we need to monitor more women with positive HPV results,”says Sonia Andersson, professor of gynecology at the Department of Women's and Children's Health at Karolinska Institute.

Women under 30 who tested positive for HPV types 16 and 18 had a much higher risk of developing precancerous diseases or cervical cancer.

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