Harvard Professor Turns Society Against Himself By Calling For Fewer Fries

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Harvard Professor Turns Society Against Himself By Calling For Fewer Fries
Harvard Professor Turns Society Against Himself By Calling For Fewer Fries
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Harvard professor turns society against himself by calling for fewer fries

Few people think that French fries are healthy food. However, the statement of an American professor about the dangers of this dish provoked a real storm among lovers of this dish.

Harvard professor turns society against himself by calling for fewer fries
Harvard professor turns society against himself by calling for fewer fries

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Few people think that French fries are healthy food. However, the statement of an American professor about the dangers of this dish provoked a real storm among lovers of this dish.

In an article in the New York Times last week, Eric Rimm, professor at Harvard T.H. Chan (Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health) said Americans need to reduce their consumption of fries.

Rimm also claims that people often find it difficult to control the portion size themselves, they often eat more than necessary. He offered his solution to the problem:

"I think it would be nice if the meal consisted of a small portion of salad and six sticks of fries."

French fries lovers immediately turned against Rimm on social networks, demanding an explanation from him. Many users were outraged by the proposal to limit themselves to only six sticks of fried potatoes. Some demanded “to stop destroying their lives,” and some demanded that Rimm's degree be taken away.

“No one in human history has stopped at six sticks of fries,” writes one Twitter user.

An employee of one of the restaurants expressed concern that customers could resort to violence if they limit themselves to six chopsticks of fries.

In response, Rimm was forced to make excuses and backtrack. “My suggestion was that maybe restaurants should offer smaller portion sizes to suit those who like the taste of fries but don't want to eat starch bombs,” he commented on his suggestion on Twitter.

Potatoes, especially fried in oil, have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A study published last year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that those who ate french fries two to three times a week had an increased risk of mortality compared to those who ate potatoes prepared in other ways.

It's no secret that Americans love processed potato products. According to the USDA, one American consumes about 53 kilograms of white potatoes annually, with two-thirds fried, frozen, or processed in various ways.

The New York Times article also indicated that the USDA recommends eating no more than 85 grams of French fries per day. In the same article, American nutritionist Lindsay Moyer also urged people to eat as little or no fries as possible, and not to dip the fries in ketchup or mayonnaise.

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