Licking A Baby's Nipple Can Be Beneficial For Children's Health

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Licking A Baby's Nipple Can Be Beneficial For Children's Health
Licking A Baby's Nipple Can Be Beneficial For Children's Health

Video: Licking A Baby's Nipple Can Be Beneficial For Children's Health

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Video: The nipple is a dummy. Harm or benefit? Соска - пустышка. Вред или польза от пустышки? 2023, February
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Licking a baby's nipple can be beneficial for children's health

It is not uncommon for parents to lick the fallen nipple themselves before giving it to the baby. It was found that in children whose parents undergo such an archaic premature with a pacifier, the level of antibodies associated with the development of asthma and other allergic diseases is lower in the blood.

Licking a baby's nipple can be beneficial for children's health
Licking a baby's nipple can be beneficial for children's health

Photo: pxhere, com /

It is not uncommon for parents to lick the fallen nipple themselves before giving it to the baby. Oddly enough, this can be beneficial for the health of the child. A study on this topic was carried out by the American organization Henry Ford Health System. It was found that in children whose parents undergo such an archaic premature with a pacifier, the level of antibodies associated with the development of asthma and other allergic diseases is lower in the blood.

The researchers speculate that this is because parents can transmit normal oral bacteria through their saliva, which affects the early development of the child's immune system.

The results of the study were presented at a conference of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Seattle.

“Although we cannot yet say that there is a direct cause-and-effect relationship, we can say that the microbes that a child is exposed to early in life will affect the further development of his immune system. Our data show that children whose nipples were cleaned by their parents had decreased IgE levels between 10 months and 18 months,”said Eliane Abou-Jaoude, American allergist and lead author of the study.

This retrospective study is considered the first in the United States to assess the relationship between different types of nipple cleansing and immunoglobulin E (IgE), which are associated with allergies and asthma. The findings support a previous study in 2013 in Sweden, which reported an association between parents licking an infant's nipple and a relatively lower risk of allergies in children.

The study involved 128 mothers who were asked about how they clean the baby's nipple: sterilize it in boiling water, wash it in the dishwasher, wash it with soap or just suck it. It turned out that 30 mothers sterilize their children's nipples, 53 wash them with soap, and nine lick them themselves.

The researchers then compared the IgE levels of infants at birth, 6 and 18 months of age, given how the nipple was cleaned, and found that IgE levels at 18 months were significantly lower in those babies whose mothers sucked on the nipple to clean it. Additional analyzes showed that differences in antibody levels were first noticed after about 10 months.

However, Dr. Abu-Yaoud warns parents against jumping to conclusions, as he says further research is needed to study the relationship between nipple licking and reduced allergy levels in detail.

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