Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?

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Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?
Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?

Video: Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?

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Video: Breast Self-Examination (It Can Save Your Life) 2023, January
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Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?

Do you fear regular breast self-exam (breast self-exam), or are you berating yourself for not doing it? No need to worry too much, the largest oncology organizations no longer consider this method a must. But what is the alternative to it?

Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?
Breast Cancer Prevention: What Are The Alternative To Self-Examination?

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Do you fear regular breast self-exam (breast self-exam), or are you berating yourself for not doing it? No need to worry too much, the largest oncology organizations no longer consider this method a must. But what is the alternative to it?

Oncologists believe that women should be vigilant about the possibility of this disease. This means that you need to know well how your mammary glands usually look, be able to see any changes in time, and seek help in a timely manner.

Self-examination was considered an essential tool in the early diagnosis of cancer, especially before the era of mammography. Many doctors still do not argue with the fact that it can save lives. However, large studies, taking into account Russian data, have shown that there is no significant decrease in mortality among women who own the technique of self-examination.

Research on this topic has had certain limitations, and experts understand this. So, even women who own the self-examination technique often do not carry out it every month or do it incorrectly. Scientists are also worried that women who examine the mammary glands using conventional techniques are more likely to have unnecessary x-rays and biopsies.

Lack of evidence for the benefits of self-examination and its reported side effects have led leading breast cancer guidelines, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Cancer Society, to deviate from this recommendation. …

However, many doctors still support self-examination, arguing that it can lead to earlier treatment initiation and better survival. It is also stored in the recommendations of a number of large resources, for example, Breastcancer.org.

Professor Lisa Jacobs of Johns Hopkins Medicine says "it should be debated if this method helps in individual use."

What does being vigilant about breast cancer mean?

University of Michigan professor Mark Pearlman, who contributed to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) guidelines, notes that half of women over the age of 50 and 70% of women under the age of 50 self-diagnose breast cancer. He says that you can spend time on the condition of the mammary glands during daily routines, for example, taking a shower or putting on a bra.

What should this vigilance include? ACOG describes it as knowing your breasts and paying attention to any changes in them. The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine website states that personal vigilance is not governed by any clear method or schedule.

Susan G. Komen, founder of a breast cancer foundation, gives a broader definition. She reminds a woman to know her risk of developing breast cancer, including her family history of the disease. You also need to do all the recommended medical checks in a timely manner and know what lifestyle factors can increase your risk of cancer. Here is its algorithm:

1. Know your risk

Find out your family history if anyone in the family has had breast cancer.

  • Talk to your doctor about your risk.

2. Get tested

If you are at high risk, discuss your screening options with your doctor.

  • Get mammograms annually if you are over 40 and do not have an increased risk.

3. Know your rate.

Visit your doctor if you find lumps in the breasts and armpits, changes in the shape of the breasts, swelling, redness, nipple changes, and other deviations from your personal norm.

4. Choose a healthy lifestyle

Maintain a healthy weight.

  • Exercise regularly.
  • Limit your alcohol intake.
  • If possible, breastfeed after childbirth.

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