Do Not Eat And Want To Lose Weight? It Will Take A Long Time

Table of contents:

Do Not Eat And Want To Lose Weight? It Will Take A Long Time
Do Not Eat And Want To Lose Weight? It Will Take A Long Time

Video: Do Not Eat And Want To Lose Weight? It Will Take A Long Time

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: What Will Happen If You Eat Nothing for 7 Days 2023, January
Anonim

Do not eat and want to lose weight? It will take a long time

If you are hoping to lose weight by eating only half of what you have on your plate, expecting to eat the other half later, then you will have to wait a long time for the result. Scientists estimate that as a result of this tactic, calorie intake increases.

Do not eat and want to lose weight? It will take a long time
Do not eat and want to lose weight? It will take a long time

Photo: Wikimedia Commons /

If you hope to lose weight by eating only half of what you have on your plate, going to eat the other half later, then you will have to wait a long time for the result. Scientists have calculated that as a result of this tactic, consumption will only increase.

Marketing researchers at the University of Michigan found that such a weight loss diet often gives people the false impression that they are "malnourished," as a result of which they "reward" themselves with an extra meal or do not exercise.

“We know that increasing portion sizes increases consumption, and significantly larger portions also lead to more and more leftovers. Our research shows that uneaten food can have a significant impact on perception, emotion, motivation and attitudes towards health,”says study author Aradhna Krishna of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Aradhna Krishna collaborated with Linda Hagen of the University of Southern California to conduct five studies to see how food leftovers on a plate can skew our perception of our eating habits and how consumers tend to judge their consumption., judging by the remains of food.

No matter how much food a person has already eaten, if the remainder was large enough, people felt like they ate a little. This misconception had a direct impact on a person's lifestyle in the following hours and even days.

People with the most food left on their plate were more likely to indulge in unhealthy snacks and larger portions afterwards because they felt they "deserved it."

Likewise, those who had a lot of food left on their plate were less likely to exercise than those who had nothing left, even if they both ate the same amount of the same food.

According to the authors of the study, if people have a lot of food on their plate, then they tend to think better of themselves, which in turn reduces their motivation to compensate for the excess calorie intake with physical activity.

Popular by topic