Does High Physical Activity Increase The Risk Of Early Menopause?

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Does High Physical Activity Increase The Risk Of Early Menopause?
Does High Physical Activity Increase The Risk Of Early Menopause?

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Does high physical activity increase the risk of early menopause?

So far, there has been conflicting evidence of the link between physical activity and menopause. Some studies have shown that women who do a lot of exercise may have a lower risk of menopause before the age of 45, while others have shown the opposite. New job says everyone was wrong.

Does high physical activity increase the risk of early menopause?
Does high physical activity increase the risk of early menopause?

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Physical activity in women is not associated with the risk of early menopause, according to the largest study ever conducted on the subject.

So far, there has been conflicting evidence of the link between physical activity and menopause. Some studies show that women who do a lot of exercise may have a lower risk of menopause before the age of 45, while other studies have shown the opposite.

However, a new study published in the journal Human Reproduction, one of the leading journals in reproductive medicine, analyzes data from 107,275 American nurses who were followed from 1989 to 2011 and shows no link between physical activity at any age and early natural life. menopause.

"Our results, combined with other studies, provide strong evidence that physical activity is unrelated to early menopause," said Dr. Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, professor of epidemiology at the University of Massachusetts who led research.

American nurses at one time filled out questionnaires, reporting on their lifestyle and health status. They were asked, in particular, how much time they devote to physical activity (walking, running, cycling, playing sports, swimming, aerobics, yoga) or exercise-related activities such as lawn mowing. The researchers also collected information on factors such as race and ethnicity, age, education, height, age when women had their first periods, whether they were pregnant and how many times, whether they used oral contraceptives and whether they underwent hormone therapy. Factors such as weight, body mass index, smoking, diet and supplementation were also considered.

To estimate the frequency, duration, and intensity of physical activity, the researchers multiplied the number of hours of exercise per week by the metabolic equivalent (MET) to calculate the total number of hours of MET per week.

Over 20 years of follow-up, 2,786 of these women began natural menopause before the age of 45. The researchers found no significant difference in the risk of early menopause between women with high and low levels of physical activity. The amount of physical activity during their adolescence was also not associated with the risk of early menopause.

“While our results do not suggest that relatively more physical activity is associated with a lower risk of early menopause, we will encourage premenopausal women to engage in physical activity as exercise is associated with a number of health benefits, such as reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, cancer breast and other diseases. Our results in no way suggest that premenopausal women should not be physically active,”said study lead author Mingfei Zhao, a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts.

Researchers continue to study other factors that may play a role in the onset of early menopause.

“Our findings suggest that several environmental factors are associated with early menopause. We found that higher intake of calcium and vitamin D from dairy products was associated with a lower risk of early menopause. A higher intake of plant protein was also associated with lower risk, as opposed to an intake of animal protein. Smoking was also associated with an increased risk, as was being underweight. We are currently investigating other factors as well,”says Dr. Burton-Johnson.

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