Acne Vaccine: Will Scientists Get A Panacea?

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Acne Vaccine: Will Scientists Get A Panacea?
Acne Vaccine: Will Scientists Get A Panacea?

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Acne vaccine: will scientists get a panacea?

American scientists have developed and are studying a vaccine that should prevent the appearance of acne on the skin. Let's figure out how it works and what expectations can be placed on it.

Acne vaccine: will scientists get a panacea?
Acne vaccine: will scientists get a panacea?

Eel formation. Photo: Wikimedia Commons /

American scientists have developed and are studying a vaccine that should prevent the appearance of acne on the skin. Let's figure out how it works and what expectations can be placed on it.

There are dozens, if not hundreds, of theories about preventing and treating acne. Some people find nutritional supplements to help. Others argue that you should refrain from consuming dairy products or even drinking dog urine to eliminate annoying and sometimes painful acne. But even the best and most scientifically proven treatments can cause side effects such as dry skin, sensitivity to sunlight and others.

And since current acne treatments are so imperfect, many may be reassured by the news that an acne vaccine is currently in the pipeline. But, as it turns out, even such a promising remedy can offer the same pitfalls as other modern methods of treating acne.

The vaccine, which will be the first of its kind if actually used, is designed to reduce the body's inflammatory response to toxins released by bacteria in the skin. So far, this vaccine has only been tested in mice and human tissue samples, but "the potential impact of our research findings is of immense importance to hundreds of millions of acne sufferers," Chun-Ming Huang said in a press release., one of the leading vaccine developers at the University of California. The research findings were published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

While an acne vaccine is still in development and is “really promising” according to American dermatologist Carlos Charles, it also has a narrow focus on the inflammatory response to skin bacteria. Emmanuel Contassot, a researcher at the University of Zürich School of Medicine, says there is every reason to hope for a new vaccine, but it could also have side effects.

“Fighting the propionic acne bacterium (P. acnes), which is the most common cause of acne, with a vaccine would be more specific and less toxic than chemical therapy. However, not all P. acnes bacteria are bad. There are different strains of these bacteria. Some of them cause acne, while others are beneficial. If the vaccine also works against beneficial strains, the patient's condition may worsen and the integrity of the skin will be compromised,”says Contasso.

At the same time, dermatologist Carlos Charles says such a vaccine would work best alongside other, more advanced acne treatments. "I would not suggest that this is the only treatment, but it may help cut down on some of the other acne treatments that are currently being used," says Charles.

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