Forehead Wrinkles May Indicate An Increased Risk Of Death

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Forehead Wrinkles May Indicate An Increased Risk Of Death
Forehead Wrinkles May Indicate An Increased Risk Of Death

Video: Forehead Wrinkles May Indicate An Increased Risk Of Death

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Video: Deep Forehead Wrinkles May Signal Heart Disease Risk 2023, February
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Forehead wrinkles may indicate an increased risk of death

Evaluating the brow wrinkles can be an easy way to identify people at increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Forehead wrinkles may indicate an increased risk of death
Forehead wrinkles may indicate an increased risk of death

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People who are older than the age norm may have an increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease in people who have severe forehead wrinkles. This is confirmed in a new study presented in Munich at the ESC-2018 congress of the European Society of Cardiology.

Evaluation of brow wrinkles can be a simple and inexpensive way to identify people at increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

“Just by looking at a person's face, you can tell if anxiety is worth it and advise them on how to reduce their risk,” says study author Yolande Esquirol, professor of occupational health at the Universitaire de Toulouse, France.

The person might be advised to make some simple lifestyle changes, such as doing more exercise or eating healthier foods.

“Of course, if this is a person with a potential risk of cardiovascular disease, you need to check risk factors such as blood pressure, lipid and blood glucose levels, but even before that you can already give him some recommendations regarding lifestyle,” notes Dr. Esquirol.

The risk of heart disease increases as people age, but lifestyle and medical interventions can reduce it. The challenge for physicians is to identify patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease as early as possible.

The study authors reported that various visible signs of aging were previously analyzed to see if they could portend cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have stated that crow's feet (wrinkles on the side of the eyes) have no connection with the risk of cardiovascular disease, but are simply a consequence of not only aging, but also the contraction of facial muscles. Previously, a link was also found between male pattern baldness, ear lobe wrinkles, xanthelasma (plaques under the skin around the eyes) and an increased risk of heart disease, but not an increased risk of death.

The authors of the current study looked at another visible marker - in a group of 3,200 working adults, they analyzed age-related horizontal forehead wrinkles to see if they mattered in assessing the risk of cardiovascular disease. The study participants - healthy people aged 32, 42, 52 and 62 years old - were examined by doctors at the beginning of the study, who rated them on a point system depending on the number and depth of forehead wrinkles. "Zero" meant no wrinkles, and a score "Three" meant "numerous deep wrinkles."

The participants were then followed for 20 years. During this period, 233 died from various causes. Of these, 15.2% were previously rated at two and three points. 6.6% had one point and 2.1% had zero (no wrinkles).

The authors found that people with one wrinkle score had an increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease when compared to people without wrinkles. Those with scores of 2 and 3 for wrinkles had nearly 10 times the risk of death compared to people who had zero scores. The researchers took into account factors such as age, gender, education, smoking, blood pressure, heart rate, diabetes and lipid levels.

Brow wrinkles are certainly not the best method for assessing the risk of cardiovascular disease compared to methods such as measuring blood pressure and lipid levels, but when assessing them, you can start sounding the alarm earlier, you just need to look at the person's face.

Researchers are not yet aware of the reasons for this relationship, however, it persisted even when factors such as occupational deformity were taken into account. Some of the researchers have put forward the theory that it may have something to do with atherosclerosis or hardening of the arteries due to the formation of cholesterol plaques. Atherosclerosis is a major factor in heart attacks and other cardiovascular diseases.

Collagen protein changes and oxidative stress also appear to play a role in both atherosclerosis and wrinkle formation. In addition, the blood vessels in the forehead are so small that they may be more susceptible to the formation of cholesterol plaques, suggesting that wrinkles may be one of the early signs of vascular aging.

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