Quitting Smoking Can Bring Diabetes Closer. But You Need To Quit Smoking

Table of contents:

Quitting Smoking Can Bring Diabetes Closer. But You Need To Quit Smoking
Quitting Smoking Can Bring Diabetes Closer. But You Need To Quit Smoking

Video: Quitting Smoking Can Bring Diabetes Closer. But You Need To Quit Smoking

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Diabetes and Smoking - Do you smoke? How I quit smoking naturally ? 2023, January
Anonim

Quitting smoking can bring diabetes closer. But you need to quit smoking

It is weight gain that increases the risk of developing diabetes mellitus after quitting smoking. If you pay attention to physical activity and healthy eating, the risk of illness will be minimal.

Quitting smoking can bring diabetes closer. But you need to quit smoking
Quitting smoking can bring diabetes closer. But you need to quit smoking

Photo: pexels.com / 1563

After quitting smoking, people often begin to gain weight, which can subsequently lead to a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This is evidenced by the results of a new study by the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. However, despite weight gain, people who quit smoking reap significant health benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and premature death. The results of the study were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“It is known that people who quit smoking may have an increased risk of diabetes or worsening glucose tolerance in the first few years after quitting smoking, which is why smokers often refuse to quit. But our research shows that weight gain triggers diabetes after smoking cessation, so if quitters minimize weight gain, the risk of developing diabetes will not increase, but will even decrease in the long run,”says Professor Qi Sun, lead author of the study.

Although a number of previous studies have shown that the risk of diabetes may increase in the first few years after smoking cessation, it was still unclear exactly what leads to the increase in this risk. In the new study, researchers looked at data from 171,150 US men and women over a 19-year period. Participants in the studies answered questions about their health and lifestyle every two years. Researchers first identified those who quit smoking and then looked at the link between their weight gain and their risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and the effect of weight gain on an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease and other causes.

Compared to those who continued to smoke, those who quit had an average 22% higher risk of type 2 diabetes. And their increased risk of diabetes peaked 5-7 years after quitting smoking, but then gradually decreased. The more weight those who quit smoking gained, the higher their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Among those who did not gain weight, there was no increased risk of diabetes. In addition, long-term smoking cessation was associated with a sustained reduction in the risk of developing diabetes: for those who quit smoking and did not smoke for 30 years later, the risk of diabetes dropped to the level of people who never smoked.

The study also showed that even among those who gained more than 10 kg after quitting smoking, the risk of early death from any cause or the development of cardiovascular disease decreased by an average of 50 and 67%, respectively.

“Smokers should not continue to smoke, citing the potential for weight gain after quitting, because quitting there is a clear, both short-term and long-term reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, smoking cessators should follow a healthy diet and exercise to minimize weight gain, prevent diabetes risk and maximize their health benefits,”said Yang Hu, co-author of this study.

Popular by topic