Common Antibiotics Have A Dangerous Side Effect

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Common Antibiotics Have A Dangerous Side Effect
Common Antibiotics Have A Dangerous Side Effect

Video: Common Antibiotics Have A Dangerous Side Effect

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Video: Common Antibiotics with a Dangerous Side Effect? 2023, February
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Common antibiotics have a dangerous side effect

Before taking antibiotics, you should always see your doctor to compare the possible benefits and harms.

Common antibiotics have a dangerous side effect
Common antibiotics have a dangerous side effect

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The use of ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics in the fluoroquinolone class can impair normal connective tissue function, including tendon rupture, tendonitis, and retinal detachment. These observations, reported in a number of journals, have led to a so-called black box warning about potentially dangerous side effects in the drug annotation.

Research has also suggested that other types of connective tissue may be involved. First of all, this concerns the aorta - a blood vessel, the state of which largely depends on the integrity of a component of connective tissue called the extracellular matrix. Two retrospective clinical studies looked at the possible link between fluoroquinolones and cardiovascular problems.

“They found that patients who received fluoroquinolones had a higher risk of developing aneurysm (formation of spherical areas in the aorta that weaken vessel integrity), rupture or dissection (loss of wall integrity) than patients who did not receive antibiotics. This has raised important concerns,”said Dr. Scott A. LeMaire, professor of surgery, molecular physiology and biophysics at Baylor College of Medicine, USA.

While studies have pointed to a link between the fluoroquinolone group and an increased risk of aortic disease, they do not prove that antibiotics are causing the problem. To determine if a causal relationship exists, the scientists conducted an experiment on laboratory mice.

Mice with normal or moderately strained aortas received either ciprofloxacin or a placebo, and after four weeks, the researchers looked at their aorta status.

The results showed that mice with normal aortas treated with ciprofloxacin did not show significant adverse effects on the aorta. 45% of mice with moderately altered aortas that received placebo had aneurysm and aortic dissection, 24% had aortic dissection, and there were no cases of aortic rupture. For mice with moderately altered aortas treated with antibiotics, 79% had aneurysm and aortic dissection, 67% had aortic dissection, and 15% had fatal aortic rupture.

Thus, the study showed that exposure to ciprofloxacin leads to faster and more severe disease progression.

“Our results support the concerns raised by previous retrospective clinical trials and suggest that ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics in the same class should be used with caution in patients with aortic dilatation,” concluded senior study author Dr. Ying H. Shen, Director of the Aortic Research Laboratory and Associate Professor of Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine.

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